Tag Archives: anchorage beer artist

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #49, December 3, 2015

Happy 49th Thirsty Thursday from the 49th State! I painted this week’s beer painting live at Anchorage Brewing Company last night. If I said I am a fan of Anchorage Brewing Company, it would be the understatement of the Millennium; I am absolutely gaga over its delicious libations. This was the 12th brewery I have painted live at since I started doing it last year, when I was invited to paint at HooDoo Brewing in Fairbanks. I have also painted at Dogfish Head (Delaware), Hill Farmstead (Vermont), Allagash (Maine), Bell’s (Michigan), Ommegang (New York), Yards (Pennsylvania), Tired Hands (PA), Spring House (PA), Midnight Sun (Anchorage), and Resolution (Anchorage). Click on each brewery’s name to see the painting from it. I like this painting of Anchorage Brewing, because it shows so much of the brewery, and, of course, both the beer and bottle in the same frame. Gabe Fletcher, the owner/operator of ABC, should be known as the Brettanomyces King, since so many of his lovely ales and beers are fermented and aged in Oak barrels. ABC starts with a lovely product and then makes it extra special with the aging process! The Mosaic Saison is a beer that has improved with age in the last few months since it’s release, and buying a bottle to be consumed at the brewery was fortuitous indeed, as this beer looks pretty too! When I saw the design for the label I knew it was only a matter of time until I painted this one!

Cheers to Anchorage, my hometown and home to Gabe Fletcher’s Anchorage Brewing Company! A place that can only be described as World Class!

The original painting sold. You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

Mosaic Saison by Anchorage Brewing Beer Painting by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #49 by Scott Clendaniel. December 3, 2015. Mosaic Saison by Anchorage Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

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Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #48, November 26, 2015

When I started the Thirsty Thursday beer paintings project, I forgot that Thanksgiving would be one of the days I would get to release a painting. Unlike last year, when I released a new beer painting every day, this year I hardly had to post on a holiday, and I kind of miss it! This week’s painting is of Peak 3 Pale Ale from Resolution Brewing. I have an art show hanging on the walls of the taproom, so I painted live there last Saturday during a decent snowstorm. This pale ale is named for a local recreational spot, which I believe is about the closest place I know where to make turns in the freshest snow close to Anchorage. Resolution Brewing is Anchorage’s smallest operating brewery. The brewers have to keep a robust brewing schedule, working with a 3 BBL system. Hard work pays off, and this small oasis is proving to be a new hot meeting spot in the up and coming neighborhood of Mountain View. The brewery is Belgian-style, but as batches are so “micro,” I think they are willing to take a stab at whatever they decide to be the flavor of the week. The brewers at this tiny facility are artfully brewing unique beers. Some of the other lovely beers I have tasted at Resolution are Tent City dry-hopped Belgian ale, Black Cup Coffee Porter, Madam sour beer blended with cherries, Lost Anchor IPA, and First Chair Amber Saison. Step up to the bar at Resolution, sometime in the near future, where you are sure to see someone you know, or make a new friend before you leave.

This original oil painting, and limited-edition prints are for sale at my Etsy shop.

Resolution Brewing beer painting by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #48 by Scott Clendaniel. November 26, 2015. Peak 3 Pale Ale by Resolution Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #37, September 10, 2015

Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) is most famous for his legendary drip paintings. Born in Wyoming, Pollock created his masterpieces in his studio in upstate New York. Jackson Pollock worked differently than traditional Western artists, stretching the boundaries of what people considered to be art. He used non-traditional mediums – paint that was more fluid-based, and engineered for building application. He would dance around an un-stretched canvas on the floor of his studio, applying paint with sticks, stiff brushes, and even used a turkey baster from time to time.

“I continue to get further away from the usual painter’s tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc.” – Jackson Pollock.

Notorious for his alcoholism, and known to drink a quart of whiskey a day, the artist died in November of 1956 in a drunken driving accident. A true shame, as he was only 44 years old. At least he really got to live for the short time he was productive on this planet. For this reason, I admit that a beer painting in his style could be considered inappropriate, but I couldn’t resist making a painting using Pollock’s technique.

I had fun channeling this artist, and really made a mess. Normally I work in oil paint, but had to buy acrylic and latex paint for this painting. I set the painting support on a larger piece of plywood outside in a large open area on my lot in McCarthy, and just started throwing paint with a big brush. No, I did not consume a quart of whiskey while working on this piece. I waited until evening before drinking a beer, although I feel it would not have hindered my ability to paint in this way. I just had to climb on ladders while working on my cabin during the afternoon. I should have done this painting in the evening so I could drink beer while applying the drips of paint. Well, hindsight is 20-20.

“It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.” – Jackson Pollock.

The original painting, and limited-edition prints are for sale at my Etsy shop.

jackson pollock beer pint painting by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #37 by Scott Clendaniel. September 10, 2015. Inspired by Jackson Pollock. 18″x26″, mixed media on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #35, August 27, 2015

Let’s revisit René Magritte. I already sampled his famous Ceci n’est pas une pipe (this is not a pipe) piece by painting a pint glass instead of a pipe, and changing the name to “Ceci n’est pas une pint.” This week’s Thirsty Thursday beer painting is a parody of his self-portrait The Son of Man. This painting leaves a lot up to the interpreter as the apple, or beer pint in this case, completely obscures the face of Magritte.  I call this one The Pint of Man.

Magritte says this about the painting, “At least it hides the face partly well, so you have the apparent face, the apple hiding the visible, but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present. (In a radio interview with Jean Neyens (1965), cited in Torczyner, Magritte: Ideas and Images, trans. Richard Millen (New York: Harry N. Abrams), p.172.)

Were you thinking about beer goggles while reading the last paragraph? Because that’s what came to my mind. I think the beer pint is a nice addition to Magritte’s concept, because alcohol hides a bit from any social interaction, yet it seems to be readily available at most social times. Entrenched drug cultures often eliminate the stigma of a drug so much that the drug becomes a normal day-to-day habit, and is no longer acknowledged for what it is. I think that the beer pint set in the stage of The Son of Man is accurate to the original concept by Magritte, because the beer interchanges so well with the apple, a symbol for the fruit of good and evil. Those of us who indulge in beer know that it is good, but too much can be evil, and sometimes can lead to harmful aftereffects. Whether beer is good, or evil is debatable, however it can definitely add, or subtract from a conversation. Alcohol can add when there is nothing to talk about, but subtract when too much clouds the mind.

Cheers, and remember, “Moderation in all things… including moderation.” – Oscar Wilde

The original oil painting sold. You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom painting at my Etsy shop.

The son of man beer pint magritte painting by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #35 by Scott Clendaniel. August 27, 2015. The Pint of Man. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #32, August 6, 2015

Holy Grail of beer?  Dom Perignon?  Tom Dalldorf is a bit on the dramatic side when describing this unique Belgian Double IPA by Anchorage Brewing Company.  He wrote the verbiage on the bottle.  Don’t get me wrong, I dig the beer.  It’s great, and I don’t doubt the 96 rating on Beer Advocate.  Actually, I think it deserves a higher score, but calling it the Holy Grail may be a bit of a hyperbole.  This beer is unique, and not what you would expect from a regular 9% IPA.  First off, it has Brettanomyces added, and second, it was aged in Chardonnay barrels, imparting a unique flavor that very few breweries come close to.  There is a reason it is 10 bucks, or more for a bottle of this caliber.  It takes extra effort, and triple fermentation to brew something this special.  I can totally see an aging monk thinking about this beer continually, going to the cold storage room to check on the barrel, just making sure it is safe.  Why is this monk so bitter?  100 IBUs from Citra and Apollo hops would cause many people to make the bitter beer face, but not as bitter as if you were chaste as well.  Imagine a lifetime of chastity, at least certain monks can enjoy the fermented juice of the barley.  Think of the cold storage room and the entry by the special abbey key leading to a very special place where warmth is only provided by consuming the brew within.  Don’t be bitter, give this brew a try.  Its unique, delicious flavor will have you wishing you bought a case!

The original oil painting, and limited-edition prints are for sale at my Etsy shop.

beer painting of bitter monk ipa by anchorage brewing by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #32 by Scott Clendaniel. August 6, 2015. Bitter Monk IPA by Anchorage Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

 

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #29, July 16, 2015

The Skilak Lake is a popular destination on the Kenai Peninsula. If you go, don’t forget to bring the Skilak Scottish Ale from Kenai River Brewing Co. Skilak is one of the biggest lakes on the Kenai and is easily accessible from Soldotna and Anchorage. The fact that it’s a popular destination makes sense, because there are two campgrounds and square miles of beautiful crystal blue water to enjoy. The views are nice too.

Skilak Scottish Ale pours with a robust creamy head that is more than ample. The aroma is of licorice and smoke. This is a very malt-forward beer that finishes with a hint of piney hops. The taste is robust of licorice candy and caramel dark grain. It is sweet and satisfying. A nice dark amber beer with a hint of peat. The mouth feel is a bit boozy even at only 5.3% ABV, and this beer is creamy and smooth. Overall, highly recommended for drinking during out of town adventures, preferably by a lake.

Cheers to Kenai River Brewing, a great Alaska brewery producing unique brews! Keep up the good work!

The original oil painting sold.  You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer oil painting of skilak scottish ale by kenai river brewing by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #29 by Scott Clendaniel. July 16, 2015. Skilak Scottish Ale by Kenai River Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #28, July 9, 2015

Henri Emile Benoît Matisse (1869-1954) was quite the prolific artist. He painted all types of things, but was mostly noted for his use of bright colors and his stylistic representation of different forms. He was a leader of the Fauve movement, of which the literal translation is, wild beasts, and which became famous for usage of color and loose painting techniques. This painting I emulated is in Matisse’s mature style, and was originally painted in 1937. The woman is Matisse’s assistant Lydia Delectorskaya dressed in Moroccan garb, sitting next to a vase of flowers and some citrus fruits. I swapped the three fruits for a beer pint (thinking of a citrusy IPA). I have always respected the work of Matisse and I chose to paint this one because a beer-loving friend in PA passed on the idea to me from one of his buddies. Reproducing Matisse’s work made me respect the artist more. It has so much more eye-popping quality in paint than a reproduction on a screen or on a printed page. When I was painting this copy, my eyes were strained from the reverberations caused by the contrasting bright color. As one steps back from the painting, the reverberations calm and the cohesive work stands out amongst other paintings. Thanks Henri for giving me something so wonderful to study and to incorporate into my Thirsty Thursday paintings series.

The original oil painting sold.  You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer painting inspired by Henri Matisse by Scott Clendaniel Woman in a purple coat with beer pint

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #28 by Scott Clendaniel. July 9, 2015. Woman in a Purple Coat with a Pint of Beer. 11″x14″, oil on panel.