Tag Archives: beer pint painting

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #37, September 10, 2015

Paul Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) is most famous for his legendary drip paintings. Born in Wyoming, Pollock created his masterpieces in his studio in upstate New York. Jackson Pollock worked differently than traditional Western artists, stretching the boundaries of what people considered to be art. He used non-traditional mediums – paint that was more fluid-based, and engineered for building application. He would dance around an un-stretched canvas on the floor of his studio, applying paint with sticks, stiff brushes, and even used a turkey baster from time to time.

“I continue to get further away from the usual painter’s tools such as easel, palette, brushes, etc.” – Jackson Pollock.

Notorious for his alcoholism, and known to drink a quart of whiskey a day, the artist died in November of 1956 in a drunken driving accident. A true shame, as he was only 44 years old. At least he really got to live for the short time he was productive on this planet. For this reason, I admit that a beer painting in his style could be considered inappropriate, but I couldn’t resist making a painting using Pollock’s technique.

I had fun channeling this artist, and really made a mess. Normally I work in oil paint, but had to buy acrylic and latex paint for this painting. I set the painting support on a larger piece of plywood outside in a large open area on my lot in McCarthy, and just started throwing paint with a big brush. No, I did not consume a quart of whiskey while working on this piece. I waited until evening before drinking a beer, although I feel it would not have hindered my ability to paint in this way. I just had to climb on ladders while working on my cabin during the afternoon. I should have done this painting in the evening so I could drink beer while applying the drips of paint. Well, hindsight is 20-20.

“It is only when I lose contact with the painting that the result is a mess. Otherwise there is pure harmony, an easy give and take, and the painting comes out well.” – Jackson Pollock.

The original painting, and limited-edition prints are for sale at my Etsy shop.

jackson pollock beer pint painting by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #37 by Scott Clendaniel. September 10, 2015. Inspired by Jackson Pollock. 18″x26″, mixed media on panel.

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Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #35, August 27, 2015

Let’s revisit René Magritte. I already sampled his famous Ceci n’est pas une pipe (this is not a pipe) piece by painting a pint glass instead of a pipe, and changing the name to “Ceci n’est pas une pint.” This week’s Thirsty Thursday beer painting is a parody of his self-portrait The Son of Man. This painting leaves a lot up to the interpreter as the apple, or beer pint in this case, completely obscures the face of Magritte.  I call this one The Pint of Man.

Magritte says this about the painting, “At least it hides the face partly well, so you have the apparent face, the apple hiding the visible, but hidden, the face of the person. It’s something that happens constantly. Everything we see hides another thing, we always want to see what is hidden by what we see. There is an interest in that which is hidden and which the visible does not show us. This interest can take the form of a quite intense feeling, a sort of conflict, one might say, between the visible that is hidden and the visible that is present. (In a radio interview with Jean Neyens (1965), cited in Torczyner, Magritte: Ideas and Images, trans. Richard Millen (New York: Harry N. Abrams), p.172.)

Were you thinking about beer goggles while reading the last paragraph? Because that’s what came to my mind. I think the beer pint is a nice addition to Magritte’s concept, because alcohol hides a bit from any social interaction, yet it seems to be readily available at most social times. Entrenched drug cultures often eliminate the stigma of a drug so much that the drug becomes a normal day-to-day habit, and is no longer acknowledged for what it is. I think that the beer pint set in the stage of The Son of Man is accurate to the original concept by Magritte, because the beer interchanges so well with the apple, a symbol for the fruit of good and evil. Those of us who indulge in beer know that it is good, but too much can be evil, and sometimes can lead to harmful aftereffects. Whether beer is good, or evil is debatable, however it can definitely add, or subtract from a conversation. Alcohol can add when there is nothing to talk about, but subtract when too much clouds the mind.

Cheers, and remember, “Moderation in all things… including moderation.” – Oscar Wilde

The original oil painting sold. You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom painting at my Etsy shop.

The son of man beer pint magritte painting by scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #35 by Scott Clendaniel. August 27, 2015. The Pint of Man. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #30, July 23, 2015

For this painting I decided to just put the paint down with a palette knife. Sometimes my palate is overwhelmed by thirst and the beer disappears. Did you catch that play on words? I haven’t worked with only a knife for a while now, but it feels good to watch the thick impasto go down. Like being thirsty, palette knife paintings take a lot more paint than traditional brushwork. Since I have upgraded my paint to the highest grade I can find, which seems to be 400% more expensive than the student grade paint, yet only 25% better, I have steered away from such thick work. But I just felt like splurging, and wanted to make this painting. I had fun working with so much medium. Unfortunately, I have been paying for it in more than just more expensive paint. The thicker the paint, the longer it takes to dry. I painted this piece in McCarthy, 310 miles from my studio in Anchorage, and I have been cleaning purple paint off a lot of things as a result. The painting spread some purple paint all over a stainless steel growler, as well as the keg hose. I was glad it didn’t get all over the inside of my truck. It rode home on the dashboard after I realized it was falling over in the back seat, thanks to the McCarthy road being so bumpy! I hope you enjoy this piece as much as I enjoyed making it! Cheers!

The original oil painting, and limited-edition prints are for sale at my Etsy shop.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7, February 12, 2015

The Scream, or as Edvard Munch (1863-1944) called it, Der Schrei Der Natur (The Scream of Nature) is one of the most famous paintings in history. Art critic Arthur Ludlow even describes it as “the Mona Lisa of modern art.” In 1893 Munch created four pieces of the same composition; one with pastels, and three in oil paint. The pastel version sold in 2012 for over $119 million. Ironically, Munch lived on a tiny stipend from his father for much of his early career, and was subjected to a large amount of negative criticism by art authorities, as well as his family members. Munch’s iconic masterpiece is the “study of the soul, that is to say the study of my own self,” as stated by Munch himself. It was painted to represent a day when the artist was out for a walk, and dropped back from his friends when he felt tired and ill. As the sun set, he says he leaned against the fence, and saw and felt the scream of nature, which he describes as tongues of fire and blood reaching over the black and bluish fjord.

Subject to bouts of anxiety and mental illness, Munch was institutionalized in 1908 for anxiety and hallucinations from his rough and tumble life for most of a whole year. Munch lived out his last two decades in Oslo on a self-sufficient estate, in relative comfort, having created a following for his artwork, and produced many paintings of nudes from a steady group of female models. When Munch was 76 he was worried about the Nazis confiscating his “degenerate art” and he hid his strongest pieces, including The Scream. When Munch died at 80, his paintings were bequeathed to the city of Oslo. In 1963 the Edvard Munch Museum opened with over 1,000 original paintings, 4,000 sketches, and 18,000 prints.

I painted this version of The Scream to show the anxiety one may feel because of an empty pint. I cannot take credit for this idea, as my friend, and fellow beer-enthusiast Rich Morgan came up with this concept. I thought it was brilliant when he told me about it, and I had to execute it. I call this painting The Scream over an Empty Pint.

The original painting sold.  You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer Painting of The Scream inspired by Edvard Munch Funny Beer Painting by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7 by Scott Clendaniel. February 12th, 2015. The Scream over an Empty Pint. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #6, February 5, 2015

I hope you can guess which artist I am emulating in this painting. I was hesitant to attempt this piece due to the differences in styles that he and I utilize. My palette is different – I don’t include black, instead using dark purples, reds and blues to shadow dark objects. I also use more texture, making high levels of detail a bit more difficult, however I tried to raise the bar on this one due to popular demand.

In case I have left you in the dark, the artist I am emulating is Salvador Dali (1904-1989). His Catalan name is Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marqués de Dalí de Pubol.  Quite a mouthful. I’m glad to report that this painter didn’t die tragically early in life, like so many famous artists. Dali, the most famous Surrealist artist, known for his exacting, but strange and unique paintings, also created many other forms of artwork including sculptures, films, and photography. He was also known to collaborate with many notable artists.

The symbolism in a Dali painting is important. Each item in the painting is included for a reason. The melting pocket watches that are morphing into clocks represent time. Since these clocks are melting, they are without time, representing eternity. In this beer-themed painting, the melting clocks are saying that it’s always beer-thirty somewhere. The crutch symbolizes human weaknesses, but also superhuman abilities brought on by art and intelligence (and beer). The elephant with the long spindly legs (look closely inside the cutout of the pint) represents human frailty. The elephants are shackled to earth by gravity, yet they are reaching for more than what is available. So Dali gave them elongated legs forever stretching to the sky, but still connected to the earth. The egg represents luck, fertility, love and hope.

I have entitled this painting The Supernatural Pint of Everlasting Effervescence. I included the symbols that I found in Dali paintings to fit with what is subconsciously happening when I think about a pint of beer. I hope you enjoy this piece, and come back next week for another Thirsty Thursday Project entry.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

Beer Pint Art Oil Painting Surrealism Salvador Dali Style Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #6 by Scott Clendaniel. February 5th, 2015. The Supernatural Pint of Everlasting Effervescence. 18″x24″, oil on panel.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 37

Let’s have a little Ten Fidy in a can, please!  This beer is remarkable!  I always wanted an imperial stout in a can and now it is available from Oskar Blues Brewery of Colorado!  This is as forward thinking as the regulation of cannabis in the brewery’s home state.  I poured this special brew at the Great Alaska Beer and Barleywine Festival here in Anchorage, and that is when I enjoyed my first taste of it.  I hope more breweries take a lesson from Oskar Blues and put out heavy beers in small cans.  I do believe there are two servings per 12 oz can of this brew that tops out at 10.5% (hence Ten Fidy).  I was glad that my wife helped me drink this specific can as I like to wake up feeling good in the morning, and a 12 oz serving may have put me over the edge.  Cheers to bold beers in cans!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy Shop.

Year of Beer 02.06 Ten Fidy by Oscar Blues Brewery. Oil on panel, 8"x10".

Year of Beer 02.06 Ten Fidy by Oscar Blues Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.