Tag Archives: Bier malerei

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #14, April 2, 2015

This week’s Thirsty Thursday painting is inspired by an artist known as the Mother of American Modernism, Georgia O’Keeffe. Her most recognizable works are oil paintings of New York skyscrapers from her early career, close ups of flowers from her mid career, and Southwest landscapes in her late career.  The most famous pieces of her long career (she died at the age of 98) are the large-scale flower paintings. People would compare the similarities in appearance between the flowers and the female genetalia. Fifty years later, in the 70’s, a group of feminist artists came to the same Freudian conclusions that critics did during the mid 1920’s. O’keeffe, however, denied that this was ever part of her intentions and refused to associate with these groups.  She painted a series of Hawaiian flowers and landscapes sponsored by the Hawaiian Pineapple Company (now Dole Foods), but her heart was really in the Southwest images she created. She purchased a property there in 1940 after spending part of every year there since 1929. She moved permanently to New Mexico in 1941 after the death of her husband Alfred Stieglitz (her main tie to NY), who was 20 years her elder. She lived out her days in New Mexico, and despite macular degeneration for the last ten years of her life, still continued to be a productive artist, making hand-built pottery and water color paintings until her death in 1986. She truly is an inspirational artist!

So I thought, “Why not represent my favorite ingredient in beer, the hop flower, in Georgia O’Keeffe style?”  So, I made a close-up image of the flowering hop with the Hop bines in the background. I call this one simply Hop Flower. I hope you like hops as much as I do!  Cheers!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

hop flower oil painting by scott clendaniel inspired by georgia o'keeffe

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #14 by Scott Clendaniel. April 2, 2015. Hop Flower. Inspired by Georgia O’Keeffe. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

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Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #10, March 5, 2015

This week I decided to make an abstract painting of a pint using the stylistic lines and forms that would be common in a Kandinsky painting. Wassily Kandinsky was born in Russia in 1866 and died in France at the ripe old age of 78. He studied law and economics at the University of Moscow, but is ultimately credited with the first completely non-objective, abstract modern art. Ironically, this beer painting is objective. Kandinsky started painting when he was 30, and studied art in Germany. He returned to Russia in 1914, when World War I broke out, but didn’t jive with Communist Moscow’s approach to art, and moved back to Germany in 1921. He taught at the Bauhaus, an avant-garde school of art and design, until the Nazis shut it down. So he moved to France in 1933 where he lived for the rest of his life, and produced his best paintings. This beer painting was inspired by composition VIII, painted in 1923 when Kandinsky was a professor at the Bauhaus. I call this painting Pint Composition. I find the paintings by Kandinsky to be both inspirational and beautiful, and I hope you enjoy my beer-themed version. I wonder if Kandinsky drank beer at the Hofbräuhaus when he lived in Munich.

The original oil painting sold.  You can purchase a limited-edition print, or commission a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop RealArtIsBetter.

Kandinsky beer painting pint by scott clendaniel thirsty thursday beer painting

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #10 by Scott Clendaniel. March 5th, 2015. Pint Composition. 6″x12″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7, February 12, 2015

The Scream, or as Edvard Munch (1863-1944) called it, Der Schrei Der Natur (The Scream of Nature) is one of the most famous paintings in history. Art critic Arthur Ludlow even describes it as “the Mona Lisa of modern art.” In 1893 Munch created four pieces of the same composition; one with pastels, and three in oil paint. The pastel version sold in 2012 for over $119 million. Ironically, Munch lived on a tiny stipend from his father for much of his early career, and was subjected to a large amount of negative criticism by art authorities, as well as his family members. Munch’s iconic masterpiece is the “study of the soul, that is to say the study of my own self,” as stated by Munch himself. It was painted to represent a day when the artist was out for a walk, and dropped back from his friends when he felt tired and ill. As the sun set, he says he leaned against the fence, and saw and felt the scream of nature, which he describes as tongues of fire and blood reaching over the black and bluish fjord.

Subject to bouts of anxiety and mental illness, Munch was institutionalized in 1908 for anxiety and hallucinations from his rough and tumble life for most of a whole year. Munch lived out his last two decades in Oslo on a self-sufficient estate, in relative comfort, having created a following for his artwork, and produced many paintings of nudes from a steady group of female models. When Munch was 76 he was worried about the Nazis confiscating his “degenerate art” and he hid his strongest pieces, including The Scream. When Munch died at 80, his paintings were bequeathed to the city of Oslo. In 1963 the Edvard Munch Museum opened with over 1,000 original paintings, 4,000 sketches, and 18,000 prints.

I painted this version of The Scream to show the anxiety one may feel because of an empty pint. I cannot take credit for this idea, as my friend, and fellow beer-enthusiast Rich Morgan came up with this concept. I thought it was brilliant when he told me about it, and I had to execute it. I call this painting The Scream over an Empty Pint.

The original painting sold.  You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer Painting of The Scream inspired by Edvard Munch Funny Beer Painting by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7 by Scott Clendaniel. February 12th, 2015. The Scream over an Empty Pint. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #6, February 5, 2015

I hope you can guess which artist I am emulating in this painting. I was hesitant to attempt this piece due to the differences in styles that he and I utilize. My palette is different – I don’t include black, instead using dark purples, reds and blues to shadow dark objects. I also use more texture, making high levels of detail a bit more difficult, however I tried to raise the bar on this one due to popular demand.

In case I have left you in the dark, the artist I am emulating is Salvador Dali (1904-1989). His Catalan name is Salvador Domingo Felipe Jacinto Dalí i Domènech, 1st Marqués de Dalí de Pubol.  Quite a mouthful. I’m glad to report that this painter didn’t die tragically early in life, like so many famous artists. Dali, the most famous Surrealist artist, known for his exacting, but strange and unique paintings, also created many other forms of artwork including sculptures, films, and photography. He was also known to collaborate with many notable artists.

The symbolism in a Dali painting is important. Each item in the painting is included for a reason. The melting pocket watches that are morphing into clocks represent time. Since these clocks are melting, they are without time, representing eternity. In this beer-themed painting, the melting clocks are saying that it’s always beer-thirty somewhere. The crutch symbolizes human weaknesses, but also superhuman abilities brought on by art and intelligence (and beer). The elephant with the long spindly legs (look closely inside the cutout of the pint) represents human frailty. The elephants are shackled to earth by gravity, yet they are reaching for more than what is available. So Dali gave them elongated legs forever stretching to the sky, but still connected to the earth. The egg represents luck, fertility, love and hope.

I have entitled this painting The Supernatural Pint of Everlasting Effervescence. I included the symbols that I found in Dali paintings to fit with what is subconsciously happening when I think about a pint of beer. I hope you enjoy this piece, and come back next week for another Thirsty Thursday Project entry.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

Beer Pint Art Oil Painting Surrealism Salvador Dali Style Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #6 by Scott Clendaniel. February 5th, 2015. The Supernatural Pint of Everlasting Effervescence. 18″x24″, oil on panel.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 364

Only one more entry left after today in the Year of Beer Paintings! Today’s featured beer painting is of Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2014 Ale by Anchor Brewing Company in San Francisco, CA. This is the 40th annual “Our Special Ale” produced by Anchor. The beer is never exactly the same and the label is always different. Every year there is a different tree on the label, although the intent is the same – joy and “celebration of the newness of life!” The tree on the label is a Sequoia this year. Anchor chose the Redwood for 2014 to represent the 150 years since Lincoln’s Yosemite Act – America’s first land grant, and one that marked the beginning of California’s State Parks. This makes me want to head back to Southern Oregon/Northern California just to hang out in the Redwoods. I would love to see the fireworks over the Golden Gate Bridge while sipping a cold “Special Ale” strait from the bottle on the hillside! There is no city quite like San Francisco!

This is a nicely balanced beer. Light amber brown in appearance with a strong malt body and a nice piney aroma and flavor. I wouldn’t call it an IPA, but I would say it is a very refreshing ale, a good one that works well in many circumstances. It’s a bit stronger than a “light” beer coming in at a respectable 5.5% ABV just like drinking a full-bodied, dark American ale. Overall, a great offering from Anchor, and a must during this holiday season!

Cheers to an amazing 2014! Grab a six-pack of “Special Ale” and prepare a toast!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Craft Beer Painting of Merry Christmas Happy New Year 2014 ale by Anchor Brewing Year of Beer Paintings Scott Clendaniel

Year of Beer 12.30. Merry Christmas and Happy New Year 2014 Ale by Anchor Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 363

The featured beer painting of the day is of Olde School barley wine style ale by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Delaware! This excellent bottle of barley wine was from 2009! Dogfish Head went through the trouble of cellaring it, and we gladly purchased it right at the brewpub in Rehoboth Beach last November (along with a 2010 bottle that I still have in my cellar). I felt like a pirate when I cracked this one open! The directions on the bottle say, “Pour contents into two snifters,” implying that one should share this strong beverage. Sam Calagione believes that this is the strongest barley wine in the world, although I know that 2013 A Deal with the Devil barley wine by Anchorage Brewing Company came in at over 17%. I’m used to drinking barley wine that is aged in barrels, but this one was not, and it was so rich, fruity and sweet! The elements of raisins, plums and dates were very evident. There are actually pureed dates and figs added to the beer, which explains why there was fine sediment at the bottom of the bottle. Sam said he was inspired to make this beer when reading vintage copies of English Cellarman’s manual stating that if a barleywine loses its carbonation, you could string up figs and dates and add them to the brew to give the beer a natural yeast boost to complete the fermentation, and to provide some extra carbonation. I give this five-year-old barleywine a solid two thumbs up, and feel like my trip to Rehoboth Beach is the trip that keeps on giving! Overall, a wonderful beer from a world-class brewery! I am glad you read that Cellarman’s manual, Sam! You are a gentleman and a scholar!

Cheers to the finest beers in the world! Olde School is keeping it real ale style right there in the far off corner of Delaware.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Craft Beer Painting of Olde School barley wine by dogfish head year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 12.29. Olde School Barley Wine Style Ale by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 362

The featured beer painting for today is of Shiner Holiday Cheer by Spoetzl Brewery in Shiner, Texas. World famous for the Shiner Bock Beer, this is a special brewery, making finely crafted beer in the heart of Texas. I think its Ruby Redbird Summer seasonal is my favorite, and this is the first time I’ve tried the Holiday Cheer. It’s a very interesting winter seasonal. When most people think of winter brews, they expect Bock and Double Bock beers – rich, dark lagers that the Germans have traditionally served for generations. Ironically, Bock is the style that Spoetzl puts out as its flagship offering, so its winter seasonal had to be something with a bit more. Officially, this beer is a dunkelweizen, or dark wheat ale, with pecans and peaches (as well as natural flavoring), which seems fitting for Texas. In Alaska the flagship seasonal is brewed with Spruce tips, and I’m sure if Alaska had anything like fruit, or nuts growing in the winter, we would add it to beer as well.

Seasonal beers are always my favorite, because they are unique, and are only available for a limited time. I think many beer seekers are driven by the same motives. Of course, everyone loves great beer that is available year-round, like Sierra Nevada’s Pale Ale, or Deschutes’ Black Butte Porter. Consistency seems to be a huge desirable trait in a flagship beer, but seasonal beers allow breweries to flex their creative muscles. I always eagerly await the release of Celebration ale every year, and when Jubelale comes out, I am as happy as a 12 year old in a candy shop. It wouldn’t be the same, though, if I could buy these types of beer all year long. It would no longer be special, like living in Hawaii all year long, instead of visiting for two weeks.

Cheers to Spoetzl’s Shiner Holiday Cheer! A beer that is sure to bring you happiness on the holiday! I hope Spoetzl keeps up the good work, and never stops making finely crafted ales and lagers!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Craft Beer oil painting of shiner holiday cheer spoetzl brewery year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 12.28. Shiner Holiday Cheer by Spoetzl Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.