Tag Archives: craft beer

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #13, March 26, 2015

This week’s beer painting for Thirsty Thursday is of Red Chair NWPA by Deschutes Brewing Company in Bend, Oregon. I neglected to include this great beer in last year’s Year of Beer Paintings series, because I painted many other great Deschutes beers, and was looking for more variety of breweries to increase the scope of the project. I chose to paint this beer this week because of the upcoming Merry Marmot Festival taking place this weekend at Arctic Valley – a ski area near Anchorage, Alaska. The festival marks the end of the ski season for this ski area, which is a bummer, because on a normal snow year we’d still have a couple weeks of great skiing left, but the lack of snow this year makes that impossible. Arctic Valley has two red chair lifts, which are Riblet brand, with the tailbone-smashing center pole. Hope your snow pants provide ample padding. Still, it’s the best option for getting to the top, the other one being a Poma t-bar. Although this beer is named for the red chair on Mt. Bachelor, I consider it to be a tribute to all red chairs out there. This North West Pale Ale has a nice hop aroma and flavor. Hardly a pale ale, full of Centennial and Cascade hops coming in with 60 IBUs, this beer is closer to an IPA. Overall, a great beer to enjoy ski après for its refreshing crisp flavor, and stunning complex malt body.

Cheers to downhill skiing, one of my favorite sports, and to Deschutes Brewing, one of my favorite NW breweries!

This painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer Art Oil Painting of Deschutes Brewing Red Chair NWPA by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #13 by Scott Clendaniel. March 26th, 2015. Red Chair NWPA by Deschutes Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

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Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #11, March 10, 2015

This week’s beer-themed painting is of Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew Ale by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery in Delaware!  This unique dark beer brewed with gesho and honey waited for the right moment in my beer cellar for several months.  I was saving it for a quiet evening when I could relax and listen to jazz while sipping on a special brew.  Like the jazz music, this beer was sensual and rhythmic, with just enough funk to make it striking.  I am a fan of what the brew team at Dogfish Head put together, and love the music themed beers.  I listened to this album for the first time 15 years ago while attending music history class at Western Oregon University.  My cool-cat professor was such a huge fan of Miles Davis, he would give away free Kind of Blue albums to people who had never heard the Miles Davis sound.  I drank the beer and painted this piece while listening to the Bitches Brew album.  The background is completely inspired by the Miles Davis sound.

Cheers to the Prince of Darkness, the original Miles Davis and to the brew crew at Dogfish Head, who was genius enough to pair beer with music!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

Beer painting of miles davis bitches brew by dogfish head by scott clendaniel thirsty thursday

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #11 by Scott Clendaniel. March 10th, 2015. Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew Ale by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #10, March 5, 2015

This week I decided to make an abstract painting of a pint using the stylistic lines and forms that would be common in a Kandinsky painting. Wassily Kandinsky was born in Russia in 1866 and died in France at the ripe old age of 78. He studied law and economics at the University of Moscow, but is ultimately credited with the first completely non-objective, abstract modern art. Ironically, this beer painting is objective. Kandinsky started painting when he was 30, and studied art in Germany. He returned to Russia in 1914, when World War I broke out, but didn’t jive with Communist Moscow’s approach to art, and moved back to Germany in 1921. He taught at the Bauhaus, an avant-garde school of art and design, until the Nazis shut it down. So he moved to France in 1933 where he lived for the rest of his life, and produced his best paintings. This beer painting was inspired by composition VIII, painted in 1923 when Kandinsky was a professor at the Bauhaus. I call this painting Pint Composition. I find the paintings by Kandinsky to be both inspirational and beautiful, and I hope you enjoy my beer-themed version. I wonder if Kandinsky drank beer at the Hofbräuhaus when he lived in Munich.

The original oil painting sold.  You can purchase a limited-edition print, or commission a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop RealArtIsBetter.

Kandinsky beer painting pint by scott clendaniel thirsty thursday beer painting

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #10 by Scott Clendaniel. March 5th, 2015. Pint Composition. 6″x12″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #9, February 26, 2015

When you have a fresh new pint of beer in front of you, and you look down at the foam, have you ever seen shapes resembling something?  Maybe if you were feeling extra artistic and had a moment that can only be described as the “aesthetic experience”.  I always get that feeling when I stare into a pint.  Like in a magic crystal ball, I see visions of the possible future, memories of past events, and sometimes inspiration strikes.  So, for this week’s Thirsty Thursday painting I painted a version of Vincent Van Gogh’s Starry Night as if I walked up to a pint and saw this sublime work of art in the foam.  The painting is composed as if the viewer is looking directly down into the pint.  Of course I have never hallucinated the Starry Night in a pint glass.  Instead, it is a metaphor for my muse.  I think this hyperbole appropriately states how important beer has been to me as an artist.  Everybody knows enough about Van Gogh, so I spare you the history lecture.  I recommend watching the Kirk Douglas movie Lust for Life, if you want to learn more about the famous artist.

Cheers to living life to its fullest!

The original painting sold. You can purchase limited-edition prints, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer painting of pint glass and starry night van gogh by scott clendaniel thirsty thursday

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #9 by Scott Clendaniel. February 26th, 2015. Starry Pint. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #8, February 19, 2015

This week’s Thirsty Thursday painting veers from the pattern of famous paintings turned into beer-themed art, because I got a call on Tuesday morning from a reporter from Channel 11 News who wanted to do a story about my art. She asked if she could film in my studio, but because my studio is really small, I suggested filming at one of my favorite local breweries, Snow Goose Restaurant and Sleeping Lady Brewing Co., because I have several paintings hanging there, the beer is great, and on Wednesdays (and Fridays) growlers are only $5! I also do chalkboard art at this place, so I spend quite a bit of time there. I haven’t painted live in a brewery since November, and I missed doing it, so I suggested doing the interview while I paint a beer. I painted this pint of Urban Wilderness Pale Ale by Sleeping Lady Brewing Co. on the railing of the deck, because this pub has the best deck in town that is packed on sunny days in the summer. This beer is mostly true to its style, but is more hopped than standard pale ales.

I was flattered to be interviewed by Heather Hintze from KTVA. I always worry whether I sound intelligent when speaking about my beer paintings, but figure it will be better to say something about them than nothing at all. Hopefully Heather will edit out all the stupid things I may have said. Painting and talking in front of a camera at the same time is more challenging than you may think. If you live in Anchorage, tune in tonight at 6 PM to Channel 11 News to see my segment.

If you have not visited “The Goose”, I highly recommend it. Keep in mind that if you’re drinking your pint on the deck in high sunlight, move your beer into the shade, or cover it. Direct UV light can damage a beer in just a couple minutes, and will make it taste “skunky”. Thanks to Gary Klopfer, Greg Mills, Dion, Dave, and the rest of the fabulous crew at the Snow Goose Restaurant and Sleeping Lady Brewing! May the restaurant prosper and stay true to its beer-centric roots!

You can purchase this painting, or limited-edition prints at my Etsy shop.

Beer art oil painting alaska beer urban wilderness sleeping lady brewing snow goose deck scott clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #8 by Scott Clendaniel. February 19th, 2015. Urban Wilderness Pale Ale by Sleeping Lady Brewing Co. 8″x10″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7, February 12, 2015

The Scream, or as Edvard Munch (1863-1944) called it, Der Schrei Der Natur (The Scream of Nature) is one of the most famous paintings in history. Art critic Arthur Ludlow even describes it as “the Mona Lisa of modern art.” In 1893 Munch created four pieces of the same composition; one with pastels, and three in oil paint. The pastel version sold in 2012 for over $119 million. Ironically, Munch lived on a tiny stipend from his father for much of his early career, and was subjected to a large amount of negative criticism by art authorities, as well as his family members. Munch’s iconic masterpiece is the “study of the soul, that is to say the study of my own self,” as stated by Munch himself. It was painted to represent a day when the artist was out for a walk, and dropped back from his friends when he felt tired and ill. As the sun set, he says he leaned against the fence, and saw and felt the scream of nature, which he describes as tongues of fire and blood reaching over the black and bluish fjord.

Subject to bouts of anxiety and mental illness, Munch was institutionalized in 1908 for anxiety and hallucinations from his rough and tumble life for most of a whole year. Munch lived out his last two decades in Oslo on a self-sufficient estate, in relative comfort, having created a following for his artwork, and produced many paintings of nudes from a steady group of female models. When Munch was 76 he was worried about the Nazis confiscating his “degenerate art” and he hid his strongest pieces, including The Scream. When Munch died at 80, his paintings were bequeathed to the city of Oslo. In 1963 the Edvard Munch Museum opened with over 1,000 original paintings, 4,000 sketches, and 18,000 prints.

I painted this version of The Scream to show the anxiety one may feel because of an empty pint. I cannot take credit for this idea, as my friend, and fellow beer-enthusiast Rich Morgan came up with this concept. I thought it was brilliant when he told me about it, and I had to execute it. I call this painting The Scream over an Empty Pint.

The original painting sold.  You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

Beer Painting of The Scream inspired by Edvard Munch Funny Beer Painting by Scott Clendaniel

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #7 by Scott Clendaniel. February 12th, 2015. The Scream over an Empty Pint. 11″x14″, oil on panel.

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #5, January 29, 2015

This week I emulated the post-impressionist style of Georges Seurat (1859-1891), who died when he was only 31 years old. The impact he had on the world of painting and color theory in his short time on Earth is impressive. Trained classically in France, and influenced by the Impressionist movement, Seurat took painting to a new level with what he called Neo-Impressionism. Today we refer to Seurat as a Post-Impressionist, or, more exacting, a pointillist. Pointillism is the use of small dots to make up the images on the canvas. The small dots blend in the viewer’s eye, yet not on the surface. Seurat’s most famous piece, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte (1884 – 1886) took two years to complete. He worked in a small studio only slightly larger than his canvas, which was 10 feet wide. This piece was rejected by the Salon de Paris (the art “authority” of the period), but he submitted it to an independent show across the street from the Salon known as the Societe des Artistes Independants, which Seurat formed a few years earlier. The concept of Pointillism was instrumental in the history of art, and Seurat, who was truly a remarkable artist, although short lived, lives on in his work. I call this painting Pint of Pale Ale on a Balcony Bannister.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

Beer Pint painting Seurat post impressionism pointillism style scott clendaniel beer art

Thirsty Thursday Beer Painting #5 by Scott Clendaniel. January 29, 2015. Pint of Pale Ale on a Balcony Bannister. 12″x24″, oil on panel.