Tag Archives: home bar beer art

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 333

The featured beer painting of the day is of the Raspberry Wheat Ale by Sea Dog Brewing Company in Portland, Maine. This beer tastes like sweet raspberry juice, but is not pink. The bottle says that natural flavor is added, and I couldn’t find evidence in the beer, on the bottle, or on the brewery’s website about real raspberries added to this brew. So, I can’t say for sure what mysterious ingredient is responsible for the strong raspberry flavor. This is another one of those frequent occasions when I wish that breweries were required to disclose ingredients on packaging like any other food and beverage product in America. Like a shandy, this beer is refreshing, and forgiving at only 4.5% ABV. After consuming this bottle, I opened a bottle of Lindemans Framboise just to taste the difference between natural flavoring and real berries, but the comparison wasn’t fair because one is a wheat ale, and the other is a tart lambic.

My wife and I were in Portland, Maine less than two weeks ago, and have fond memories of the port town. The background scene in this painting is from a photo I took in Freeport. We drove down to the water to find a lobster shack, but it was closed for the season, so we didn’t linger by the water long, because we were too cold, and drove to a larger lobster restaurant near the outlet stores.

Cheers to the Raspberry Wheat Ale! A good beer for drinking on a boat! I hope your beer always makes people happy!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Raspberry Wheat Ale by Sea Dog Brewing Year of Beer Paintings Scott Clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.29. Raspberry Wheat Ale by Sea Dog Brewing Company. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 330

This year is flying by! I only have 35 beer paintings to make, and I have scheduled beers for the rest of the year! At least I haven’t been bored. You know your life is getting a little hectic when you find that sitting on the airplane is a nice break. I’m still hoping we’ll get some snow before tomorrow, but that doesn’t seem to be likely. Right now our roads are as icy as an ice arena. Now is a good time to put on your skates and take a frosty bottle down to a lake for a good ol’ fashioned sip and slide.

The featured beer painting for today is of Prairie Hop Belgian-Style Ale by Prairie Artisan Ales in Oklahoma. So far every sip of beer I’ve had from this spectacular brewery has brought joy to my palate! The first time I ran across this brewery was at the Culmination Beer Festival in Anchorage, and if a brewery is invited to this event, that’s saying a lot for the quality of its beer. I have definitely enjoyed the Cherry Funk; and the Prairie Bomb was one of the best imperial stouts I’ve ever had! Last night when I cracked open this dry-hopped saison, I was immediately impressed. The Simcoe and Citra hops are very evident, and produce a pleasant citrus aftertaste. The beer was carbonated perfectly, which made it taste refreshing. I was surprised when I saw on the bottle that the ABV is 8%, because it tastes very smooth, like a beer that could be around 5%. The last time I had a pale ale that tasted this nice was in Vermont, and I think that is saying something. I really do not know anything about the Sooner State except that the Prairie Artisan Ales are really good, so when I think of Oklahoma, I think of this brewery. Looks like I will have to add y’all to my “must visit for beer” list. Thanks, Lisa and Jim, for bringing this beer from your travels for my project!

Cheers to the best beers in Oklahoma! Great work on the Prairie Hop! I hop you keep on making such vibrant, interesting, avant-garde brews!

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Prairie Hop Year of Beer Paintings Scott Clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.26. Prairie Hop Belgian-Style Ale by Prairie Artisan Ales. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 327

The featured beer painting is Pile -o- Dirt Porter, handcrafted by Crow Peak Brewing Company in the Black Hills in Spearfish, South Dakota. I couldn’t find a beer in Alaska from South Dakota, but am lucky enough to know people who were willing to contribute to this project by bringing this can in their luggage for me from their travels. So, this is the first beer I’ve ever painted from South Dakota, thanks to John and Carolyn! I am now only missing four states from the project: Alabama (should be arriving any day now), West Virginia, Tennessee, and Arizona. So, if you are reading this, and you can send, or bring me a beer from West Virginia, Tennessee, or Arizona, you can be a beer hero. I will send you something tasty from Alaska in return.

Pile -o- Dirt Porter is a nice, robust porter. It was foamy and friendly, and went down smoothly, like a good craft beer should. A porter is a great beer style, originally invented in England, and described as a dark bitter. True to style, although with decidedly American flourishes in the form of 2-row base malt and American hops, this beer was fresh and delicious. If I drank it anywhere in the world, I would be happy to consume it. So, maybe I will get a chance to brave the South Dakota beer-tasting environment and have a Pile -o- Dirt in its home state. I have a new goal, to visit every state and have a local beer there. So far, I’ve only been to eighteen.

Cheers to the Pile -o- Dirt! As the can says, “Peace, love, funk”.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of pile o dirt porter by crow peak brewing year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.23. Pile -o- Dirt Porter by Crow Peak Brewing Company. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 326

The featured beer painting of the day is of Racer 5 IPA by Bear Republic Brewing Company in Healdsburg, California. This West Coast style IPA is the brewery’s flagship beer. I found this bottle in Philadelphia, and brought it home, because I can’t buy it here in Anchorage, Alaska. Bear Republic’s Racer 5 has won a slew of awards, including the Gold medal at the 2009 Great American Beer Festival. I decided to give it higher honors by putting the Borg-Warner trophy in the background of this painting. This beer is decidedly awesome at 7.5% ABV and 75 IBUs. It tasted exactly what I think a fresh IPA should be like – big piney and citrus flavors with a floral hop aroma. I hope you cherish every drop, and don’t try to win any racing awards when you consume this product. It is too tasty to waste in a chug-a-thon. All right IPA lovers, get your engines ready, make a pit stop, and keep on racing right along to the check-out-line. As the checkered flag waves, you’ll be back home watching the Indy 500 while sipping on cold Racer 5 IPA. Vroom!

Cheers to Racer 5, the beer that drives you to cheer for racing carnage! I hope you can get a hold of this particular brew. It’s mighty fine!

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer painting of racer 5 ipa by bear republic brewing year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.22. Racer 5 IPA by Bear Republic Brewing Company. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 325

Wow! Back in Anchorage, Alaska after an epic brewery tour around the East Coast! We visited 16 breweries in 16 days. In Pennsylvania we went to Victory Brewing, Spring House Brewing, Tröegs Brewing, Tired Hands Brewing, Earth-Bread+Brewery, and Yards Brewing. As a bonus, at the Philly Museum of Art Craft Show we got to taste several offerings from new Philly breweries at a beer tasting event organized by Joe Sixpack: Evil Genius Beer Company, Neshaminy Creek Brewing, Saint Benjamin Brewing, and Broken Goblet Brewery. Thank you, Joe Sixpack, for inviting us to that event! Then we took a detour to Delaware, just to go to Dogfish Head Brewery, and then headed north to New York where we visited Brewery Ommegang. Then, on to Vermont, where we stopped by Fiddlehead Brewery, and Hill Farmstead. On our way to Maine, we visited White Birch Brewing in New Hampshire, and the following day went to Maine Beer Company. On the last day in Maine, we went to Allagash Brewing. Then we had to drive through New Hampshire again to get to Boston, so we stopped at Earth Eagle Brewings. Finally, in Boston we went to Trillium Brewing, and Cambridge Brewing. We could have added Harpoon Brewing to the list, but the off site brewery tasting room that was right at our departure gate at the Boston airport was closed at 7 AM.

We also visited some noteworthy pubs and taprooms that were superb, including McMenamins Tavern in Mt. Airy, Side Bar in West Chester, Blind Tiger Ale House in Manhattan, Tørst in Brooklyn, Farmhouse Tap & Grill in Burlington, Prohibition Pig in Waterbury, Novare Res Bier Café in Portland, and Row 34 in Boston! Phew! I painted live in one pub and seven breweries. I learned a lot on this trip, which was a very valuable experience.

So, let’s talk about today’s featured beer painting. We went to some amazing bottle shops on this trip, and Maria picked up this bottle of Edmund Fitzgerald Porter by Great Lakes Brewing Company in Cleveland, Ohio. This porter is legendary with flavors of smoky roasted malt, coffee, chocolate, complex hops and malt bitterness. This brew hits you on the front and back of your tongue, caressing your palate, urging you to take another small sip. The story of the wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald is a tragic one. This steamer hauling tons and tons of iron sank in 1975. Since iron is a conductor, the ship was an electrical storm magnet. I can only imagine how fast it went down loaded with all that iron.

Cheers to the complexity of Edmund Fitgerald Porter – a beer that boasts a bold flavor, and won’t let you down. “The legend lives on from the Chippewa on down” – Gordon Lightfoot.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Edmund Fitzgerald Porter by Great Lakes Brewing Year of Beer Paintings scott Clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.21. Edmund Fitzgerald Porter by Great Lakes Brewing Company. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 321

The featured beer painting of the day is of Arthur Farmhouse Saison by Hill Farmstead Brewery in Greensboro Bend, Vermont. This beer is a world-class saison! Tart, spicy, and peppery with a bit of Brett to make it just funky enough. This beer is unique and amazing, and is a perfect dinner saison, one that you would be proud to serve at a Thanksgiving dinner. At 6% ABV, it isn’t too strong, nor too weak. Light yellow in appearance with a nice heady foam that dissipates very slowly.

Prior to my visit, I called the brewery, and Shaun Hill answered the phone. I asked if I could paint live in the tasting room and he said that he wouldn’t mind if I painted outside. I thought it was too cold to paint outside, and replied that I’d prefer to work inside. Little did I know, that there are no tables at this unique and crowded brewery. I was surprised when I arrived after such an amazing experience at Brewery Ommegang, an orderly establishment that was very welcoming, to find a line almost out the door at Hill Farmstead that was looping around a barn-like tasting room. We arrived about ten minutes after opening, and asked if there was a special release today, but one of the regulars replied that, “It’s always like this.” There were two lines: one for growler fills and tastings, and one for bottles. I slipped into the much shorter bottle line and bought this bottle of Arthur, but was told not to consume it on premise, which is understandable. So I asked if I could see what the beer looks like when poured into a glass so I could paint it, but was told that I needed special permission, which I felt I had, but I didn’t press the issue. My wife decided to wait in line for tasters while I worked outside, and asked me in a low voice, “Are you sure you want to paint here?” I replied that this was my only opportunity to paint at this world-class brewery, and reminded her that I have painted in worse conditions in Alaska. She just looked at me like I was crazy, as I took my bottle of Arthur outside into the 28-degree weather.

It was snowing outside, so I decided I could paint under the roofed keg storage facility, and attempted to bust a painting out as quickly as possible. My fingers were half frozen before I got halfway through the painting. The mild gusts of wind kept blowing away all my paper towels that I use for wiping brushes, into the field. So, several times, I had to set down the painting and scurry after them feeling like a complete idiot for even attempting to paint in this circumstance. I completed the painting and went back inside nearly an hour and half later, and was surprised to see that Maria had advanced only halfway through the line. At least she got far enough to order some tasters. So she handed me her glass over the cattle rope, and I eagerly accepted it. Thirty minutes later, Maria had tasted all four offerings, but she was still far from the front of the line, so she stepped out, and we bought a bottle of Sue, an oaked pale ale, and left.

Standing in line for beer that is distributed in small quantities was a common theme during our visit to Vermont. All the good beer was a limited release, available only at a certain place, at a specific time. I think a better solution would be printing an expiration date on the bottles and cans, so people know how fresh the product is, instead of controlling the releases so tightly. Hill Farmstead definitely needs to change the process in the tasting room. Get rid of the cattle line, get some tables, and hire at least one more person to serve tasters and fill growlers. I am lucky to live in Anchorage where I can buy Midnight Sun Brewing and Anchorage Brewing beer without standing in line, and any time I feel like drinking it. I feel sorry for Heady Topper and Hill Farmstead fans, having to try so hard to get their favorite beer.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Arthur Rustic Farmhouse Saison by Hill Farmstead Year of Beer Paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.17. Arthur Rustic Farmhouse Saison by Hill Farmstead Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 316

The featured beer painting of the day is of Dogfish Head Craft Brewery’s cask-conditioned 75 Minute Boil IPA, painted live at the brewery’s pub in Rehoboth Beach, Delaware. I painted this particular beer, because I wanted to depict one that I could only get at the brewery, and it also came in the classic cask ale glass, so I thought that would look cool in the painting. I was having so much fun painting and tasting the samples Maria ordered, while trying to get the reflection just right on the glass. As I was putting the last touches on the painting, the two women who were sitting at the table next to us commented that they had been watching my progress from the start and really liked the outcome. Turns out they had gotten married in Rehoboth Beach the previous day, and the Best Person in their wedding was really into the beer that I was painting, and they asked if they could buy my painting right then. I was taken aback and started to tell them that the paint had to dry for two weeks, and that I could mail the painting to them. Maria cut me off, because she noticed that the pub had to-go pizza boxes that were just the right size, so we packed the painting in one of those, right after I wrote a special message on it. Often my oil paintings sell before the paint is dry, but this was a new sales speed record.

That evening, after a short walk to the beach, we headed back to the pub for the Ancient Ales beer dinner with DFH founder Sam Calagione, and Professor Pat McGovern. Sam walked around to every table to meet people, and told me that there were other Clendaniels in the room. When he went back to the front of the room, he found out that the other Clendaniels own one of my paintings! I walked over to meet them, and we were amazed at how tight-knit the beer community is. The couple at our table, Mike and Marcia, became our Facebook friends, because we had such a great time sharing beer stories. This is the kind of trip I will never forget! Thanks Dogfish Head for being the coolest brewery outside of Alaska I have ever visited!

Cheers to the Cask Conditioned 75 Minute Boil IPA! A delicious cask beer that turned out to be the fastest sale of my life! I hope that the new couple’s marriage stands the tests of time and that my painting makes it home to Virginia safely!

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of 75 minute ipa by dogfish head brewery year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.12. 75 Minute IPA by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

 

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 314

The featured beer painting of the day is of Brawler Ale by Yards Brewing Company in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Known as the pugilist ale, the Brawler is a fairly authentic English mild at 4.2% ABV, a true session brew. The label on the bottle, which I didn’t have, considering I was painting a draft pint right at the source, depicts a revolution era boxer battling the devil. I am particularly fond of this malt-forward, delicately hopped beer, and what better place to consume it than at the brewery in Philly! I sampled several beers at the tasting room while I painted this one, including the Revolution series and the signature IPA. All were very tasty. The ales of the revolution are modeled after historic recipes by America’s founders: George Washington, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson. I don’t know of any other brewery that attempts to recreate these recipes. I have ties to the Brawler, as I painted it as a commission a few years back, and it was the first Philly beer I had ever consumed. That bottle was hand-delivered to Anchorage all the way from Philly. I like to taste what I paint, and won’t even put a painting in the Year of Beer Paintings series unless I have tried it, since I have to blog about it. The more I paint live in brewery tasting rooms, the more I’m starting to like it. The first time I ever did that was in Fairbanks, Alaska. People have been asking what my favorite beer is from the series, and I may have to say HooDoo IPA from Fairbanks. Mainly because it was the first time I painted beer live in a tasting room, and I was well received at the brewery. Yards reminded me of that occasion, so this may be my second favorite painting session. I felt in the zone as I listened to the buzz of a busy pub.

Cheers to the Pugilist Ale, I hope you don’t have to start a bar brawl before the beer is gone! Watch out because the devil doesn’t want to lose.

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print, or a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

beer painting of Brawler Ale by Yards Brewing Year of Beer Paintings Scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.10. Brawler Ale by Yards Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 312

Well, this is the first painting I painted live in Pennsylvania, at the Spring House Brewing Company’s Taproom. The beer depicted is the Braaaiins Pumpkin Ale for Zombies. On the way there we drove through Amish country and I nabbed a few shots of this really old cemetery. Since I knew that Spring House was into zombies and Halloween-themed things, I thought that the local cemetery would be the perfect setting for this painting. The Spring House Taproom was really cool, and I am glad it is the first place I painted live during the middle of the afternoon on a Wednesday. The lunch crowd was thinning out as I set up my little painting operation.

I tasted most of the beers available, and I think the Curses IPA was my favorite coming in at 6.66% ABV. We decided as a group (I was there with Maria and Rich Morgan, a big supporter since the conception of this project) that the Braaaiins Pumpkin Ale was the best one to represent the brewery. The pumpkin in this one was really delicious, and it was one of the better pumpkin ales I have tasted. I think that the name of this beer is really funny, because Maria and I have been snacking on pumpkin seeds that she roasted around Halloween time, and if you think about it, the seeds are the brains of the Jack O’ Lantern.

Cheers to the Braaaiins! Finally, a beer that may make you smarter!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of brains pumpkin ale for zombies by spring house brewing year of beer paintings scott clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.08. Braaaiins Pumpkin Ale for Zombies by Spring House Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 311

The featured beer painting of the day is of Session Fest Premium Red Lager by Full Sail Brewing Company in Hood River, Oregon. A Czech style strong lager named Polomatve in Czech, which means semi-dark. The team at Full Sail wanted to make a beer that would represent the holidays and the winter season in a way that would bring cheer into your world during the darker, colder months of the year. Brewed with four malts, including wheat, and a special blend of Cascade and Glacier hops, this beer comes off a little spicy, smells great, and tastes easy enough to drink a few.

I have always liked Full Sail Brewing, and have been drinking its beers since the dawn of my beer drinking days. When the Session Ale came out a few years back, I knew exactly what they were aiming at – an American style lager made to the traditional recipes of a pre-prohibition style. That is why it comes in the stubby bottle, it’s traditional. As for the Fest version, I don’t know why they called it a Session, except to keep it in the same sized bottle as the Black Lager and the Premium Lager. At 6.2% I would hardly call this one sessionable. So be warned, this beer comes in 12 packs, and if you only split it with one other sessioner, you may be in for a morning of discomfort. Just a heads up that the name could be slightly misleading about the alcohol content.

I think the bottles and caps are the most fun things about Session Lager beer. The stubby bottle reminds me of the old Olympia beer, back before it was bought by the conglomerate beer companies. Under each cap you’ll find a picture of a rock, paper, or scissors, but Fest caps have fruitcake, gift-wrap, or a carving knife. The cap on this bottle had gift-wrap, which is fitting as I make these paintings as a gift to your eyes.

Cheers to the holidays! I hope you get to grab some Session Fest! It tastes as good as it looks, and will fill you with holiday cheer!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Session Fest Lager by Full Sail Brewing Year of Beer Paintings Scott Clendaniel

Year of Beer 11.07. Session Fest Lager by Full Sail Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.