Monthly Archives: June 2014

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 181

Today’s beer painting is of Perpetual Imperial Pale Ale from the Tröegs Brewing Company in Hershey, Pennsylvania.  I have to admit I was a little skeptical of this Imperial IPA, because most breweries put a single IPA in a can.  Although there is no light contamination, and the breweries can just about eliminate any oxygen from the can, whenever I see a 7.5% IPA in a can, I worry about heat contamination.  The aluminum, although not a very good heat sink, transfers more heat than a glass bottle.  The good news is that this can was very fresh, and not to my real surprise, the beer was phenomenal!  I have been really happy with every product I have tasted from Tröegs!  Thanks, Rich, for taking the time to mail another batch of PA brews!

For only 85 IBUs there were a lot of floral hops in this one, and when I look at the hop bill I can see why.  It’s a very diverse group: Bravo, Chinook and Mt. Hood in the boil, and Mt. Hood and Nugget in the HopBack machine, then dry hopped with Citra and Cascade!  A process that obviously shows that these guys love beer!  You can make a beer with hop extract and skip almost all these steps, but your beer will be yellow and boring without any amazing hop character.  With this three-step hopping procedure you get Perpetual IPA!  A fine example of a fresh hop grenade!

Let the machine keep turning its gears!  I want this beer perpetually in my beer fridge, but sadly I only got one!  I should be happy I even go to try this incredibly fresh Hop Bomb of an IPA!  Cheers!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Perpetual IPA by Tröegs brewing year of beer clendaniel

Year of Beer 06.30. Perpetual IPA by Tröegs Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

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Year of Beer Paintings – Day 180

The beer painting of the day is of Perle ai Porci Oyster Stout.  Brewed with oysters and clams by Birra Del Borgo, this Italian stout is a beer crafted with unique ingredients.  Black as night with a bit of a briny flavor, this beer is remarkable in its own way.  Oysters have their place in brewing history.  During the Victorian era in England many northern pub patrons would consume copious amounts of oysters and wash them down with English stout.  The stout came to be called Oyster Stout because between sips of beer they would shoot oysters.  Then around the early 1800s brewers discovered that adding oyster shells made the beer clarify faster.  There are several claims that in 1929 in New Zealand the meat of the oyster was included in the boiling process for the first time.  So, to my surprise, oyster stout has a long history leading up to the Perle ai Porci.

So what did I think of the Oyster Stout from Italy?  It was an excellent stout with a slight salty flavor at the end of each sip!  I liked it better than oyster ice cream, but still think the best way to eat oysters is to barbeque them, or to simply shoot ‘em raw!

Cheers to the Perle Ai Porci!  One of the most unique beers you will find in the world!  I hope you get a chance to taste this oddity, as there is probably a limited quantity available!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Painting gallery.

Beer Painting of Perle ai Porci Oyster Stout by Birra Del Borgo in Italy Year of Beer Paintings

Year of Beer 06.29. Perle ai Porci Oyster Stout by Birra Del Borgo. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 179

KBS!  Stout for breakfast!  Seriously, I was going to drink this last night but my wife warned me that if I drank this beer without her, she would… well, I won’t go into the details.  She came home too late last night after a long day of guiding visitors around Alaska, so here I am doing my part sipping on 6 oz of beautiful coffee and chocolate Kentucky Breakfast Stout at 10 AM so I can write this blog post about it.

Rich and malty, with a bitter bite, and a nutty flavor.  At 70 IBUs, the bitterness is masked by the malt.  The nutty flavor reminds me of coconut beers; must be part of the barrel aging at cave temperatures.  This beer is thick on your tongue creating a blanket of pleasure.  I can see why it is one of the most sought-after beers in the Midwest!  Thanks Patrick for mailing it to me, this was a special treat!

Cheers to Founders!  I am glad I found out about your brewery through this project!  I hope you keep on making KBS!  I know it is probably a labor of love, especially paying for the cave real estate!  I now understand why there is limited availability of this one, as it is obviously hard to make a beer this special!

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of KBS by Founders Brewing Year of Beer Paintings

Year of Beer 06.28. KBS by Founders Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 178

Deviant Dale’s India Pale Ale!  What a beer!  I love a great IPA in a can, and this is a great example.  I wish I knew about Oskar Blues when I lived in Colorado for a brief 10 months.  I was in Gunnison anyway, a town that need a brewery.  I heard there used to be a bar on campus (every university needs a brewpub on campus)!  What a great idea — the university could offer a four-year brewers degree and support the drinking habits of the students who are of age!

I have loved Deviant Dale’s IPA from the first sip I took about five years ago!  It is so good, I should have painted it ages ago, like Rasputin or Torpedo.  This beer is an icon of brewing achievements!  Great work brewers!  I hope you make more lovely batches and can them all!  Maybe don’t put this in the “Stovepipe” can, as that would be dangerous, unless shared.  So malty, yet so fragrant, I just want to swig it down!  IPA gets me into trouble as I just love the flavor so much, but it’s kinda strong.  That’s what happens when you learn to drink swillable session beers, then switch over to decadent IPA.  Well, I will stay home and keep out of trouble tonight, sipping not chugging this awesome beer!

To Oskar Blues!  I can buy your beer here in Alaska!  Yeah!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of Deviant dale's ipa by oskar blues brewery year of beer paintings clendaniel

Year of Beer 06.27. Deviant Dale’s IPA by Oskar Blues Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

 

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 177

The beer painting of the day is of Armory XPA from Deschutes Brewing Company.  Originally brewed as the first batch from the Portland, Oregon brewpub, this beer is a fantastic American Pale Ale!  I’m glad this beer is not called an IPA, even though it could be.  So many beers Americans call IPA should be XPA, APA, or anything but India Pale Ale.  These beers brewed in England were English Ales made for easy transport, or for specific markets outside of England (like Russian Imperial Stout), but people think they are from those places.  Anyway, the style has been changed and the beers don’t even have English Ale yeast in them, so I like that Deschutes called this beer what it is — an Experimental Pale Ale.

This beer is bold and hoppy, like an IPA, but a bit different.  I could taste American yeast and all American hops, with a hop bill of Nugget and Northern Brewer for bittering, Cascade and Centennial for flavoring/aroma, and Citra for the dry hopping.  This beast of a brew is boasting some of the best hops in the Pacific North West!  I love a big bold beer, but don’t like to lose control from too much alcohol, so a beer like this one, with high IBUs and only 5.9% makes me a hoppy beer lover!  I hope you get a bottle of this seasonal product!  When it’s hoppy, you have to get it while it’s fresh!  This one may be gone and never made again!  Well, probably not, as it is the first beer made at the Portland pub, so it has history working for it!

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings series.

Beer Painting of Armory XPA by Deschutes Brewing Year of Beer Clendaniel

Year of Beer 06.26. Armory XPA by Deschutes Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 176

I’ll Plead the 5th… the imperial stout from Dark Horse Brewing Company, that is.  This 11% beer should not be taken lightly; I have barley wines that have less booze in them.  I loved this one, so black, with dark, oily foam that quickly faded from my glass.  Looking into my glass felt like staring at a dark abyss of crude oil.  I think I even saw a rainbow floating in the top of the glass.  Charred chocolate and toasted malt make this beer roasty, yet mostly bitter and sour from the dark grains.  Hardly balanced, this beer will take your tongue to new heights, maybe to a place where you, well… plead the Fifth.

I painted the Constitution behind this Imperial Stout to remind us how great a Nation we have where we can “Plead the Fifth” in more ways than one!  I hope I only have to drink the beer and never get called in to court.

Cheers to Dark Horse Brewing! Drinking a beer from a place where I’ve never been makes me want to go there.  Thanks Patrick for sending me this bottle all the way from Michigan!

The original painting sold. You can purchase a limited-edition print, or order a custom beer painting at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer painting of plead the 5th imperial stout by dark horse brewing year of beer paintings

Year of Beer 06.25. Plead the 5th Imperial Stout by Dark Horse Brewing Co. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.

Year of Beer Paintings – Day 175

The beer painting of the day is of 90 Minute IPA by Dogfish Head Brewery.  The first sip was rich and malty.  What I expected to be a hop bomb turned out to be nearly perfectly balanced.  At ninety IBUs and 9% ABV, who would have known that this ridiculously strong-flavored ale isn’t a palate crusher?  If you try to do anything after drinking even a 6 oz serving of this beer, you should rethink your plans and sit on the couch for at least 30 minutes, just to make sure you are safe to move.

Dogfish Head’s label has a Dogfish shark on it.  I thought of some of the silly beer movies and figured if this beer were featured as part of a stupid movie’s plotline it would entail a shark loose in one of the beer vats.

Dogfish Head, you did it again with another fine offering!  Malty and hoppy — a fine 90 minute boil!  Brewers do it longer!  Delaware for beer!  I’ll be sure to visit your taproom on my beer trippin’ tour in November.

You can purchase this painting, or a limited-edition print at my Etsy shop.

View the complete Year of Beer Paintings gallery.

Beer Painting of 90 minute IPA by Dogfish head brewery year of beer paintings

Year of Beer 06.24. 90 Minute IPA by Dogfish Head Craft Brewery. Oil on panel, 8″x10″.